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RIGHT OF ABODE

LOCATION: CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

IMAGES: TAUNYANE

VIDEO: CIE PRODUCTIONS

YEAR: 2015                     

 

Ghana currently offers the “Right of Abode” program, which allows people of Africandescent to gain permanent residency. According to the Ghanaian Immigration Act of 2000, “The concept of right of abode under Immigration Law is that person having theright of abode ‘shall be free to live and to come and go into and from the country with-out let or hindrance."

 

We have long been exposed to images of slaves running fom colonial captors, beinghung from trees with ropes justied by religion and capitalism. These are the imagesthat continue to plague us to this day.We have reached the apex of African existance and as the youth look to adobt a newkind of Africa. An Africa where our brothers and sisters lost in colonial transition headthe call to return home.What does this new Africa look like? What does this cross pollination of cultures look like?

HI JACK

LOCATION: CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

IMAGES: FAITH IN A JAR

YEAR: 2015                     

 

A collaboration between TAUNYANE ( Mandlakatixo Shonhiwa ), Wordsmith ( Thabiso Nkoana ) and Lesiba Mabitsela Studio. The film is an adaptation of Thabiso Nkoana's poem 'Hi Jack'.

 

The idea of perspex over cloth came during flashbacks of visits to my grandmother. The need to display but at the same time protect that which is valuable . It forces us all to reflect on our value systems and which of those systems benefit the people of CapeTown .

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PUBLIC ART INTERVENTION: ALTERNATIVE OPENING OF PARILIMENT FASHION PARADE

PARTNER: AFAI ( AFRICAN ARTS INSITUTE ) AND PRINCE CLAUSE ART PROJECT

LOCATION: CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

IMAGES: MICHAEL SOLOMON

YEAR: 2015

 

AFAI collaborated with various artists to create an Alternative Opening of Parliament Fashion Parade – as part of the Prince Claus Public Art Project. This highly performative fashion parade took place on Thursday, 12 February in Khayelitsha (outside the Harare Public Library) at the same time as the SA Opening of Parliament fashion parade and then again on Friday 13 February at Company Gardens.

Through fashion and performance, and as direct commentary to the annual State of the Nation Address (SONA), the artists reflected on the state of our nation post-1994. The garments – also paraded on a red carpet – reflectedon the lack of sanitation, the dismal state of the South African education system, extreme wealth vs. extreme poverty and homelessness (in the Western Cape in particular but within South Africa in general). While one of the outfits, created by Francois Knoetze and made of cellphone covers, critiqued the lack of communication between government and its people as well as issues of censorship, another piece – directed by Nozuko Madokwe  – highlighted the violence inflicted on people by structures such as the Red Ants who continually evict families from their homes. Coincidently and sadly, the undemocratic proceedings in the SONA2015 – namely, the blocking of the cellphone signals in Parliament, the violent removal of the opposition party from Parliament plus the highly biased reporting of the SONA by the SABC (public broadcaster) – highlighted the seriousness of the issues raised in the alternative fashion show.

The overall fashion show was curated by Designer and stylist, Nonhlanhla Mditshwa. The actors/models as well as performance poet, Siphosethu Pikoli, are from Khanyisa Youth Development and the incredible designers involved in this project were Maurice Mbikayi, Nceba Jadezweni, Lesiba Mabitsela, Francios Knoetze, Chifunilo Mulusa, and Nozuko Modokwe.

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GROUP EXHIBITION: DEMONSTRATIONS - PERFORMING BEING BLACK

CURATOR: KHANYISILE MBONGWA

GALLERY: BRUNDYN +

LOCATION: CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

IMAGES: NONCEDO GXEKWA 

YEAR: 2013

 

"The exhibition explores the concept of authenticity and the commodification of township blackness – in a tourist industry where cultural identity is translated into currency. The stereotyping of black bodies has facilitated the experience of being black with the harsh laws of spacing. This ‘identity of place’ creates singular, fixed and static identities." Khanyisile Mbongwa

 

The second part of the exhibition mimics “township tours” as a critique of them. A series of performances were staged in pre-selected alley ways in Gugulethu. The alley ways were transformed into temporary theatre spaces – where audience could view and experience ‘authentic township blackness’. Artist from different fields had been invited to take part.

 

Participating Artists: Mandla Mlangeni, Nicholus Sithole, Asanda Vokwana; Siyabonga Njica; Koleka Putuma, Siyabulela Sikawuti, Lesiba Mabitsela